Page 24 of 26 FirstFirst ... 142223242526 LastLast
Results 231 to 240 of 257
  1. #231

    Quote Originally Posted by jakeslouw View Post
    If your water doesn't have the necessary minerals, then yes, it could affect your yeast.
    And the pH (a result of water chemistry) will also effect enzyme efficiancy and conversion during the mash.

    The reason I ask is that I took FG readings of 2 beers (I brewed them the same way except for the water that is different) there is a big difference in the attenuation.

    Ill have a look at all the numbers today when I have all the info at hand. Maybe I just skrewed things up somewhere else along the line.



    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Harhm; 14th November 2017 at 10:07. Reason: http://www.wortsandall.co.za/showthread.php?1602-Confused-about-how-this-went-wrong&p=11770

  2. #232
    I posted the info and same question here.

  3. #233
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Somerset West
    Posts
    17
    When using a refractometer to measure OG and FG, which calculator/table would you guys recommend to calculate ABV? Brewers' Friend, Northern Brewer, Sean Terrill, ABV Apps - all seem to give you different answers for the same data. I brewed a Porter with an OG of 12.9 Brix and a FG of 5.8 Brix. I would expect to get a ABV of around 5-5.5%



    Sent from my Vodacom Power Tab 10 using Tapatalk

  4. #234
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Hartbeespoort/De Wildt
    Posts
    1,099
    Quote Originally Posted by AbriDS View Post
    When using a refractometer to measure OG and FG, which calculator/table would you guys recommend to calculate ABV? Brewers' Friend, Northern Brewer, Sean Terrill, ABV Apps - all seem to give you different answers for the same data. I brewed a Porter with an OG of 12.9 Brix and a FG of 5.8 Brix. I would expect to get a ABV of around 5-5.5%
    A refractometer struggles to read the correct FG:

    Refractometers and Alcohol:
    In the presence of alcohol, refractometer measurements get even more complicated. Alcohol throws off the refraction even more. The good news is, it can be corrected for if the OG is known. Sean Terrill posted research on the subject and arrived at the following equation which we have taken to be the most accurate:
    FG = 1.0000 – 0.0044993*RIi + 0.011774*RIf + 0.00027581*RIi – 0.0012717*RIf – 0.0000072800*RIi + 0.000063293*RIf
    http://seanterrill.com/2011/04/07/re...er-fg-results/

  5. #235
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Somerset West
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by jakeslouw View Post
    A refractometer struggles to read the correct FG:

    Refractometers and Alcohol:
    In the presence of alcohol, refractometer measurements get even more complicated. Alcohol throws off the refraction even more. The good news is, it can be corrected for if the OG is known. Sean Terrill posted research on the subject and arrived at the following equation which we have taken to be the most accurate:
    FG = 1.0000 0.0044993*RIi + 0.011774*RIf + 0.00027581*RIi 0.0012717*RIf 0.0000072800*RIi + 0.000063293*RIf
    http://seanterrill.com/2011/04/07/re...er-fg-results/
    Thanks! His calculator is one of the ones I used. Gives me 5.1% ABV, which is what I would expect

    Sent from my Vodacom Power Tab 10 using Tapatalk

  6. #236
    So I've got 1 CO2 bottle(2kg), 1 regulator and 3 taps. and plenty kegs. This is an obvious problem.
    Is there a specific manifold or splitter that addresses this issue for beer? Or should I have something made up at my local engineering shop?
    Surely others have the same issue?
    Even if I can just get 2 taps running at the same time that would be great. can it be as simple as a Y Split on the gas line from the regulator?

  7. #237
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Hartbeespoort/De Wildt
    Posts
    1,099
    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyZA View Post
    So I've got 1 CO2 bottle(2kg), 1 regulator and 3 taps. and plenty kegs. This is an obvious problem.
    Is there a specific manifold or splitter that addresses this issue for beer? Or should I have something made up at my local engineering shop?
    Surely others have the same issue?
    Even if I can just get 2 taps running at the same time that would be great. can it be as simple as a Y Split on the gas line from the regulator?
    Some guys run up to 6 kegs on one CO2 bottle, just keeping splitting the CO2 gas line with a John Guest Y-fitting.

  8. #238
    That's what I do. One regulator and cylinder, gas line splits to each coupler with a JG Y splitter. Beerline from each coupler to each individual tap
    Cheers

    Jacques

  9. #239
    If you split your line from one regulator it means all kegs are at same psi. If you need different psi for different kegs you will need secondary regulators.

  10. #240
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Hartbeespoort/De Wildt
    Posts
    1,099

    Quote Originally Posted by Setsumi View Post
    If you split your line from one regulator it means all kegs are at same psi. If you need different psi for different kegs you will need secondary regulators.
    correct, but unless you are purist, you can get everything to dispense reasonably well at the same psi

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •