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Thread: Vienna...ale?

  1. #71

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    Problem is at 1.9% ABV it'll only take one session to kill them all, and another for the keg to die...
    I think your missing the point of a session beer

    And throw your IR thermometer away. It probably was the issue. Not so good for anything shiney, reflective, translucent, transparent etc. Probably get more accuracy leaving a piece of black ceramic in the the wort, then pulling it out and scanning the temp on that.

    I still think it's a beer well made
    Last edited by Langchop; 15th July 2019 at 13:54.
    Cheers,
    Lang
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Dudddde...Hold my beer!".... ; "I wonder what will happen if I ...."
    www.ginormity.com

  2. #72
    I obviously have a special interest in these very low abv beers I currently have version 10 of my Lite and Extra Lite lagers in the fermenter.

    As a mater of interest I had a look at my brew logs on the Lite lagers and the highest that I mashed was 70c and still had 72% attenuation on a 4% abv Lager, and 68 on 2.5% Extra Lite Lagers with 70% attenuation the lowest that is why I think you should have a good look at all the causes of low attenuation.

    With 44% attenuation it will not only be the mash temp that's the culprit here, it will be a combination of a few factors. It is important to note that just fermenting within the suggested temp range of a specific yeast is not a guarantee to get good yeast performance, lager yeast are not always as "forgiving" as ale yeast.
    Last edited by Harhm; 15th July 2019 at 15:18.
    I love brewing session beers and lagersTime is on your side, never rush a beer Have fun, its only beer

  3. #73
    Well my entire brew day was rife with issues, as described earlier. You're welcome to play along with my issues and replicate them, to make your own 1.9% ABV beer? I'm joking, but seriously it is worrying, yes. Something's amiss in the brew, and I sincerely hope those bottles don't go kaboom on me in the near future when the yeast decides that the temps are "lekker". I'm HOPEFULLY getting a fridge this weekend so I can ferment properly, and also store some brews cold, so there's that.

  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post

    Anyway, in short, going forward, I need a good thermometer, preferably something digital. Anyone got recommendations? As cheap as possible would be nice...
    I have an old school lab thermometer, the glass type as a backup, no batteries and darn accurate. Its rated to -2C to 360C. It's a cheap low tech solution for a low tech problem, you can leave it in the boil too if you want.

  5. #75
    Thanks but no thanks I have enough of my own brewing issues that I need to sort out. Then again if you give me a mash temp target Ill gladly brew the same beer to see where I end up with it.

    All things said you are doing ground breaking work by brewing around 2% abv, its a difficult range to brew at You did great going over to all grain and I'm very sure your beer will be 100%, well sure enough that my offer still stands that I will gladly look after 6 of them for a few months.
    Last edited by Harhm; 15th July 2019 at 16:19.
    I love brewing session beers and lagersTime is on your side, never rush a beer Have fun, its only beer

  6. #76
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Im sure you'll be very satisfied with the final result once carbonated.

    On that note, doesn't 2nd fermentation in the bottle add 0.5% abv and not only a mere 0.05% as per your calcs ??
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  7. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by groenspookasem View Post
    I have an old school lab thermometer, the glass type as a backup, no batteries and darn accurate. Its rated to -2C to 360C. It's a cheap low tech solution for a low tech problem, you can leave it in the boil too if you want.
    I do have a normal "candy thermometer" that ranges from 20C to around 250C if I remember correctly, but the measurements aren't accurate enough for my tastes. I like seeing on a screen for example, 68.3C, and then I know, and I don't have to guess if the line ends somewhere between 65C and 70C what size that space is and is it 2C or 3C more, I dunno. I'm full of shit, I know :P
    Quote Originally Posted by Harhm View Post
    Thanks but no thanks I have enough of my own brewing issues that I need to sort out. Then again if you give me a mash temp target Ill gladly brew the same beer to see where I end up with it.

    All things said you are doing ground breaking work by brewing around 2% abv, its a difficult range to brew at You did great going over to all grain and I'm very sure your beer will be 100%, well sure enough that my offer still stands that I will gladly look after 6 of them for a few months.
    Heh, considering I only have 12 bottles, I'm going to be looking after them very well myself! It's a pretty malt-forward brew, so I've got an experiment planned with them. Langchop actually gave me the idea. I'll be "lagering" a bottle in my fermentation fridge for 2 months, and I'll also be storing an identical bottle in a cupboard in the pantry at room temp for 2 months. At 2 months I'll pull them both closer and do a side-by-side test.

    Quote Originally Posted by JIGSAW View Post
    Im sure you'll be very satisfied with the final result once carbonated.

    On that note, doesn't 2nd fermentation in the bottle add 0.5% abv and not only a mere 0.05% as per your calcs ??
    Yeah I'm pretty sure it'll be a good beer once carbed, I agree. On the ABV, I was always under the assumption that the carbonation drops add negligible amounts of alcohol, in the range of 0.1% ABV. I checked with a calculator and it seems like it's closer to 0.4% actually. That means my beer will be around the 2.2% ABV mark, which is still way under the 4.5% I hoped for before starting this, but it's not too bad. Eh.

  8. #78
    OK taking a look at the carbonating bottles, it seems there's more than enough yeast in the bottles to carbonate the beer. Gelatin didn't take out all of it (didn't expect it would, anyway). They're slower than what I'm used to, but they're still carbonating. Will give them three weeks and then I'm moving one bottle into the fridge for "lagering".

  9. #79
    OK let's do this post first, because I'm pretty excited about this. Last night I couldn't keep myself anymore and after 2 weeks in the bottle, I had to taste one. So I popped one in the fridge to cool down to nice and chilled (was around 6C), and poured...



    First thing that struck me was the head. For just 2 weeks at a relatively low carbonation temperature, this beer was well carbonated. Head was relatively creamy and quite thick. Clarity has taken a bit of a backseat and I think it's even less clear than when I bottled. That's fine though, because it still has some time to go. Regarding the sediment in the bottle - pretty solid on the bottom, and very, very little has settled out. Gelatin for a few weeks before bottling REALLY works. Definitely will be doing that again.

    Anyway, the head subsided a bit after a few seconds, and I snapped another pic:



    Again, that colour...

    On the nose, you get hit hard with Vienna's nutty, earthy scent. It's on the money. I'm really glad I didn't go with more Vienna in this. The biscuity sweetness of the Caramunich also comes through well, but that's more in the taste and I THINK I'll turn it down slightly in the next batch. There is very little hops on the nose, as is expected, and I can compare the hop scent with a light lager like Castle Lite. I'm glad, because I was hoping it wouldn't be a too bitter beer, and I think with this amount I nailed it.

    Taster... First thing that hit me was that this is a very "rich" beer. Flavour is full, and pretty sweet. You get a slightly dry-ish hit which is weird because of the sweetness, but I contribute that to the nutty/biscuity flavour. I think my mouth was playing tricks on me there. The bitterness is spot on. It's not missing like in some "beers" like Flying Fish, but it's not "in your face" like in other more hopped beers. It's just good. There, noticeable, and smooth. I like Admiral. I'll definitely use it again.

    Mouthfeel is rich. Richer than I expected from a beer around the 2% ABV mark. I think it's because of the super high ending gravity (1.018), but I don't mind. It's not oily and doesn't "coat" your mouth, so I'm happy with that. The rich mouthfeel I think contributes to the "fullness" of the beer, and it really does feel "nutritional", to use a word often used in milk stouts.

    The aftertaste is slightly bitter, and also sweet, and pretty nutty. It reminds me of fresh nuts, but not a specific nut. If I can describe it most closely, it tastes a bit like that brown "fins" in the shell of pecans, but not as dry or bitter. It's good. I really, really like this beer, and I can't wait to see how it ages out.

    As a tester - I've taken two beers and marked them. One is stuck into the fridge at 6C, and the other is placed on top of the fridge at room temp. In a few weeks/months I'll compare the two side by side, and we can see what difference cold lagering vs warm lagering will have. I'm excited to test it. I think 2 months will be a good time to give them, don't you think?

  10. #80

    It does look more-ish for sure. Also, if my history is anything to go by, that sweetness often seems to mellow out and age a beer well. I think you are going to love this even more in a couple of months (cos I know you are very patient)

    As an aside, I think you should seriously consider doing the BJCP course one day and do some beer judging. Your assessments are top notch
    Cheers,
    Lang
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Dudddde...Hold my beer!".... ; "I wonder what will happen if I ...."
    www.ginormity.com

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