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  1. #1

    Advice on my first batch


    My starter kit came with a Belgian Lager. I followed all the instructions to the letter, sanitized everything before starting. Within about 12 hours of pitching the yeast, the airlock started bubbling. Now it is 72 hours later and there is basically zero action on the airlock.Is this normal? The plan is 7 days in the fermenter and 7 days in bottles as that is what it said on the can. Temperature range listed on the can was 18-30 degrees and it was at 27 degrees for the first two days then dropped slowly down to 24 after that since a bit of a cold front came through. Looking at the fermenter, it also seems like there was a very minimal krausen, maybe 1cm if that.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by FriedPiggy View Post
    My starter kit came with a Belgian Lager. I followed all the instructions to the letter, sanitized everything before starting. Within about 12 hours of pitching the yeast, the airlock started bubbling. Now it is 72 hours later and there is basically zero action on the airlock.Is this normal? The plan is 7 days in the fermenter and 7 days in bottles as that is what it said on the can. Temperature range listed on the can was 18-30 degrees and it was at 27 degrees for the first two days then dropped slowly down to 24 after that since a bit of a cold front came through. Looking at the fermenter, it also seems like there was a very minimal krausen, maybe 1cm if that.
    27 degrees is WARM. That'll explain why the yeast chased through the sugars. Yeast will ferment at 18-30, yes, but it's usually recommended to stick to the low end of that. For ales, I like the ~21C range.

    Do a hydrometer reading and see what it says?

    EDIT: Oh, and what was the starting gravity?

  3. #3
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    @27C its possible to be done in 72Hrs yes ... but like Toxxyc said ... take gravity readings for the next 2 days to make sure its done ... by then you on day 5 ... let it sit an extra 2 days for the yeast to "cleanup" ... and bob's your uncle, you're on day 7 and ready to bottle on day 8.

    i personally tho would let it sit for 10 days minimum
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  4. #4
    OG was 1042. I planned on following the instructions on the tin since it's my first batch. Tin said ferment for 5 to 7 days then bottle. Planned on a week in a bottle before starting to drink em. I am not overly concerned with how this batch comes out as it was kit and kilo that I just wanted to get done so that I had some form of "beer" in the house. Plan on doing an all-grain blonde ale once my fermenter bucket is freed up. The temperature is an issue I know, but living in Durban there is not much I can do. I cannot justify buying a fridge just for beer-making during the current climate of reduced / no salary so I am planning on building a fermentation cupboard that is pretty highly insulated and that I can keep cool with a Peltier chiller. I might need to drop in two Peltiers but it should be able to bring temps down to the 20-degree point constantly.

  5. #5
    Before you waste money on peltiers , investigate kveik yeast. You can get some from brewkegtap.co.za. Runs happy at 20C-39C with no strange esters as you'll find on your belgian lager yeast. I have to heat my fermchamber to keep it warm :-)

  6. #6
    Yea dude 27 is warm for a normal Yeast. But like groen said +1 for Kveik.
    On this ferment. Let it sit and clean up like Jig said. 7 days is n good place to start considering the fast ferment.

    Sent from my SM-A750F using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FriedPiggy View Post
    OG was 1042. I planned on following the instructions on the tin since it's my first batch. Tin said ferment for 5 to 7 days then bottle. Planned on a week in a bottle before starting to drink em. I am not overly concerned with how this batch comes out as it was kit and kilo that I just wanted to get done so that I had some form of "beer" in the house. Plan on doing an all-grain blonde ale once my fermenter bucket is freed up. The temperature is an issue I know, but living in Durban there is not much I can do. I cannot justify buying a fridge just for beer-making during the current climate of reduced / no salary so I am planning on building a fermentation cupboard that is pretty highly insulated and that I can keep cool with a Peltier chiller. I might need to drop in two Peltiers but it should be able to bring temps down to the 20-degree point constantly.
    I wouldn't play with peltiers. They're heat exchangers, not really coolers. I'd rather use a cooler box, two or three big towels and a few ice packs. I tried fermenting in a cupboard before and the humidity wrecked the panels a bit, so that had to stop.

    My tip: Find the coolest part in your house. There is one, trust me. That corner where the sun never shines and you never sit because it's too cold. Place the cooler box there. Slip an ice pack or two into the cooler box next to the fermenter and drape two or three towels over it. Replace the ice packs in 8 to 10 hour rotations. I fermented like that for a long time, right through summer, and managed to keep the fermenter at 20C for weeks this way.

  8. #8
    well, 96 hours or so in and the SG reading I just took is 1010 so it looks like it's on track. I then went and spilled the lot out onto the counter, but did manage to dip my tongue into the dregs left in the tube I use for the hydrometer and it tastes like beer. So I am all happy. I will now do a reading tomorrow and Sunday and if it's stable I will bottle on Monday.

  9. #9
    Just thought of something else. My batch is just under 23L. I think I will probably lose about 1L during all the readings, spillage during bottling, and other things. The problem I have is that I only have 25 x 750 ml bottles meaning 18.75 L of bottling space. Would it destroy the beer if I bottled as much as I could and then bottled the remainder a few days later?

  10. #10
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Don't you have any soda bottles in the house?

    Otherwise buy some 4x 1L coke or flavour of your choice and drink them before Monday ?
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


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