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  1. #11

    A little off topic, but its old and its related.

    Has anyone ever tried using sorghum in a beer recipe, and with any success?

    Now I am not talking about traditional umqombothi methods, I am talking about using it in a typical BIAB type method, say 50/50 with pale malt, or something like that.

    I assume the souring in the traditional sense is only because you 'want' it and 'let' it sour, rather than being a natural characteristic of the sorghum itself.

    I am largely interested in if this could be used toward making a whiskey, with a southern african element to it.
    Cheers,
    Lang
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Dudddde...Hold my beer!".... ; "I wonder what will happen if I ...."

  2. #12
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Did you read THIS-Brewing-with-sorghum thread?
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  3. #13
    Thanks. Yea I read a few of the threads here. In a nutshell it follows this trend:
    - Its a complicated process
    - Its mostly still used for 'sour' beers
    - No one really 'keeps at it', which says a lot. Except Setsumi, but he seemed to be an exception
    So I am already put off, but what I might do is get some king korn and do a few 'porridge in a pot' experiments, and check consistency, conversion etc and decide from there.
    Cheers,
    Lang
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Dudddde...Hold my beer!".... ; "I wonder what will happen if I ...."

  4. #14
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    Why not just buy some Maltabella? It's milled, malted sorghum. Mix it with cold water and then slowly with hotter to prevent it lumping up. It should give you a flavour. It tastes a lot like chocolate or malted beverages like Milo. It's pretty good. I think it could be pretty nice in a stout.

    Maltabella has salt added, just keep that in mind.

  5. #15
    Wow, apparently beer, contrary to most foods and drinks we consume, normally contains so little salt that in "Potomania (drinking too much) can lead to hyponatrimia (sodium deficiency)" This sounds like a win given its recommended to reduce salt intake.

    Anyway, back to your point... On one of the threads here someone mentioned he tried a few forms of it and actually got best results (flavour) from the maltabella.

    I somehow think courseness of the grind (less flour) would be a big selection factor here, especially in terms of 'stuck sparge' and trying to keep the beer clear.
    Cheers,
    Lang
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Dudddde...Hold my beer!".... ; "I wonder what will happen if I ...."

  6. #16
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    So maltabella is ground pretty fine, but it's not a FLOUR. I can compare it most to something like a maize meal. It's a meal, not a flour. It mixes pretty well with cold water, but when cooked it absorbs A LOT of moisture, so keep that in mind. I think cooking instructions involves something like 1:8 meal to water ratio (by weight) to cook it into a porridge, so I would go for a massive water bill when mashing, or just use very little in the mash.

  7. #17
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    i disapprove of this porridge slop, but if it was me, i'd do a decoction and keep the slop from my main brew vessel.

    sorghum whiskies are a thing, apparently very 'earthy' in taste - tastes like soil, made in japan or some fringe spots in the us

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