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  1. #1

    Help with harvested yeast please


    I bottled an IPA yesterday after 10 days in primary. There was still occasional airlock action but the gravity had been stable at 1,015 for three days and Iím thirsty. After draining pretty much all the beer I added just over a liter of boiled water cooled to room temperature and gave the carboy a good swirl. Then I carried on priming and capping. I estimate that there was about a 2 l layer of yeast cake before I added the water. I used hop socks during the boil and for dry hopping so there wouldnít have been any hops in it. I mashed using BIAB.
    I couldnít see a clear distinction in layers after about a hour in the carboy so I decanted about two thirds into a 5 l sterilized jar. After a few hours everything was still in suspension (no settling out) so I left it overnight. Now, about 20 hours after adding water to the yeast cake, there are only two layers - the clear one on top and the creamy one at the bottom. Is it safe to assume that the creamy one is mainly yeast without trub? Can I decant from the 5 l jar into two smaller ones and use one per brew for my next two brews?
    73EADA5D-9B8D-4966-85B6-CC2FD8EEF053.jpg

  2. #2
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Im just gonna give a short answer as I dont like to get complicated .... YES
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by JIGSAW View Post
    Im just gonna give a short answer as I dont like to get complicated .... YES
    Much appreciated. Do I pour off the clear liquid before decanting? And after storing it in the fridge do I just bring it back to room temperature and pitch?

  4. #4
    Yes. That will be fine, BUT. Next time. Just mix up that last bit of slurry and bottle it. Mark the caps, store in your fridge and gooi the whole thing into your next brew. It should be fine for long but the longest I've done is 6 months. There are MANY better and more scientific ways of doing it but this way is the simplest with the least chance of infection.

    And now I went and elaborated. But anyway there is much more out there. GFGI if you want more info. Washing and glycol storage and such

  5. #5
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouter View Post
    Much appreciated. Do I pour off the clear liquid before decanting?
    As much as possible yes .... but I always believe its good to have a little sanitary beer on top of your yeast cake you're saving for later.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mouter View Post
    And after storing it in the fridge do I just bring it back to room temperature and pitch?
    I pitch straight from the fridge ... never had a problem ... even Whitelabs suggested to pitch their yeast straight from the fridge
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jannieverjaar View Post
    Yes. That will be fine, BUT. Next time. Just mix up that last bit of slurry and bottle it. Mark the caps, store in your fridge and gooi the whole thing into your next brew. It should be fine for long but the longest I've done is 6 months. There are MANY better and more scientific ways of doing it but this way is the simplest with the least chance of infection.

    And now I went and elaborated. But anyway there is much more out there. GFGI if you want more info. Washing and glycol storage and such
    Quote Originally Posted by JIGSAW View Post
    As much as possible yes .... but I always believe its good to have a little sanitary beer on top of your yeast cake you're saving for later. I pitch straight from the fridge ... never had a problem ... even Whitelabs suggested to pitch their yeast straight from the fridge
    Thanks gentlemen

  7. #7
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    Just make sure your process is CLEAN. I had a jar of S-189 the other day I wanted to use for a Pils. I saved it in January somewhere I believe. When I opened it, it smelled "funky" and when I let it get to room temp I knew it was totally off. Had to dump it. I think I may have been a bit lax with my sanitizing of the jar.

  8. #8
    Thanks, I tend to be quite meticulous with sanitisation but of course anything could happen working in a kitchen. Jannieverjaar’s suggestion of simply bottling the slurry seems to pose the least risk, although that will include trub if there is. Having said that; I didn’t have much success in washing the yeast of my IPA.
    Last edited by Mouter; 18th June 2020 at 08:29.

  9. #9
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    Well I'll be honest here - I bottle the entire slurry. When I'm done bottling, I simply swirl the fermenter to get all the slurry in the bottom nice and loose, and then I just tip over the fermenter into a jar. That's it. Jar is sealed and placed in the fridge. Done. I don't wash, I don't rinse, I don't split. Next brew I just tip the whole jar into the fermenter, sludge and trub and yeast and all.

  10. #10

    I've done a few methods
    - separatory funnel / yeast washing / entire trub dump into a jar after kegging / propagation from trub / top cropping,
    the last being my current favorite.
    I've top cropped bottom fermenting 34/70 and propagated this successfully, I have however never dumped fresh wort onto an existing yeast cake, it should work, but I have a thing with racking into something clean and sanitized

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