Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,146

    ^ All losses are worked into the recipe / equipment profile of your software ??

    Screenshot_1.jpg

    So from pre-boil, 7L is a fairly standard amount
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  2. #12
    Member Lyndsay's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Zwavelpoort, Pretoria East
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    Why and how did you dump the yeast? If you dump yeast in the middle of fermentation, you're removing hard-working cells from the work they're doing.

    Regarding the loss, it's not too uncommon, but that number is a tad high. I usually lose around 5l in total, although boil-off isn't a "loss" in my books as it's mostly water and it's calculated into the recipe.
    Ok, As you know, I am new to this - although very enthralled.

    I have a GF fermenter which means I can dump through the conical.
    They way it was explained to me is that the yeast that has "stopped working" (died?) will sink down to the bottom and has no further use
    I then dumped this three times towards the end of the ferment - Day of bottling, Day before bottling and 3 days before.

    It would appear that I was only left with fermented wort with no yeast paste left over. Had I been a bit more adventurous and taken last bottle from the fermenter (not through the drain pipe) I would probably have got another 440ml.

    Am I doing correctly?

  3. #13
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Cape Town
    Posts
    2,146
    ^ That sounds about right then ... thats mostly what others do from the YT videos I've seen
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Pretoria
    Posts
    1,470
    Quote Originally Posted by Lyndsay View Post
    They way it was explained to me is that the yeast that has "stopped working" (died?) will sink down to the bottom and has no further use
    I don't know about this. When falling out of suspension it doesn't mean it's dead, as I have it. If they were dead, we'd all be pitching only dead yeast into our new beers. I would never remove anything yeast-related from an active fermentation. Even if you're only taking out 1 yeast cell that's still working, you're making the work harder for the remaining cells. Rather let the beer finish off, then cold crash, and then take off the trub. That way you'll save on your losses and have a faster/better ferment.

  5. #15

    I top crop with great success with no discernible impact on fermentation, dead yeasts are cannibalized by the living and act as a source on nutrient. Fascinating things these sacc. cervs. I'm still inclined to believe that aerating your wort during transfer assists your initial pitch to propagate a bit before anaerobic fermentation kicks off, although the amount of yeast cells pitched these days doesn't really require this initial aeration anymore - harkens to "back in the day" processes. Aeration stone anyone?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •