Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Racking cockup

  1. #1

    Racking cockup


    So, I planned a bottling date this morning of my pale ale brew I had fermenting in 2 x 5gal plastic carboys for about 10 days - all fermenting motion had come an end about 5 days ago with all the trub at the bottom, nice clear beer with the odd co2 bubble rising.

    I successfully racked the first fermentor via a plunger syphon thingy, added with some dextrose (2.6 units) for priming into the bottling bucket - not to disturb the trub at the bottom of the fermentor and managed bottle about 18 quarts with some leftovers in the bucket. All good so far.

    In my attempt to rack the second fermentor to the bottling bucket, I clamp the syphon with a plastic hardware type clamp to the top of the carboy to keep the syphon in place above the trub, when fuckkit the clamp slipped and the syphon dislodged to the bottom of the fermentor and disturbed the trub, sucking in lots of porridge into the bottling bucket. In my attempt to lift the syphon out from the trub I managed to make matters worse. Mmmm..

    What do I do now? The suspended trub in the bottling bucket wasn't in a hurry to settle fast, so I decanted the beer back 50/50 in both fermentors and primed with CO2 from my bicycle CO2 inflator and swirled up the trube to get the yeast activated again in hope the yeast will eat the priming sugar
    and hopefully will remove added O2 from the wort and raise the abv a bit. I hope that excessive oxidation is not going to spoil the broth. Damn.

    What other options would I have had? Call it the day and open a beer?
    Haha. Anyway, damage is done - or maybe not - hope to make the best of it. It's probably Monday today.

  2. #2
    You did good. You could have poured back into one fermenter but If i was you i would have completed my bottling day but bottling with the trub you sucked up and let the bottles with the higher trub load sit a week longer before drinking. You wouldn't know the difference.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Hartbeespoort/De Wildt
    Posts
    1,587
    I agree, I would have let the bucket settle for half an hour and then bottled as normal.

  4. #4
    Happened to me once with the last few bottled. No difference in taste, just pour carefully and leave the last bit with trub in bottle.
    Everyone must beleive in something, I beleive I'll have another beer

  5. #5
    Usually the trub is quite solid and spongy when settled at the bottom - yesterday morning it stirred up like nothing. Been thinking about it - why ? why ? then I got the theory that it was warmer yesterday round Cape Town - more than days and weeks before, so was thinking that because of the higher temp the yeast started waking up / reactivating a bit from its cold slumber - maybe it hadn't finished fermenting completely. I used US05 which likes warmer temps I guess than 12-14 isch.

    Anyway, the fermentors where going crazy yesterday afernoon and last night - like there are invisible catfish swimming around. LOL. Quiet again this morning. Warm again today then cooling towards the weekend when I'll attempt bottling again.

    BTW recipe FG states 1.011 - Yesterday I measured 1.009 - so assumed the fermentation was complete. Now with the added dextrose estimate the FG might be 1.007.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jannieverjaar View Post
    You did good. You could have poured back into one fermenter but If i was you i would have completed my bottling day but bottling with the trub you sucked up and let the bottles with the higher trub load sit a week longer before drinking. You wouldn't know the difference.
    It was too much for one fermentor - I guess about 60% in each fermentor now - including the old trub. I was worried about oxidation - leaving it in the bottling bucket to settle for too long - as I mentioned the murk wasn't settling fast.

    Anyway, I'll have a second chance at it. Thanks for all the other advise.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by BeerHolic View Post
    Happened to me once with the last few bottled. No difference in taste, just pour carefully and leave the last bit with trub in bottle.
    Yeah, most of my bottled beer has a bit of porridge at the bottom (some more than others - and some almost none) and hence don't pour the last bits - but I'm forever aiming for that perfection - on getting it right as much as possible. Yesterday wasn't one of those days.

  8. #8

    I tested with the dregs of the bottling bucket into a single bottle.
    Popped it in the fridge for a day, it separated nicely with a fairly thick trub line at the bottom.
    From being at fridge temp the trub hardened up quite nicely and didnt budge when I poured the beer.

    So Im a lot less stressed about it now, the cold temps seem to fix the problem.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •