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  1. #51
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treeman View Post
    My first beers have stood two weeks today from bottling.
    I am surprised that I made beer and delighted that its not some disgusting horror, but a bit let down in other aspects.
    The beer is very cloudy, but it did take 7 hrs to cool the wort.
    The beer is week I will run a alcohol test a bit later, but I am thinking below 4 %.
    It taste on the better side of "OK", but certainly not a "wow!" - I will drink it and its enjoyable,at least not a dump it matter, but its no award winner,
    Will it get better with more time?, Only two weeks at the moment.
    Not gonna read the whole thread again, but what was your 1st brew? A kit+kilo, Partial extract, or full all grain ?

    How is the carbonation now as i recall you said it wasn't great after a few days.

    Let the beer condition another week ... should be even better by next weekend and then also put 1 or 2 away in the back of a cupboard to try in 2-3 months.

    Lots of craft beer you buy from pubs are also not clear. Cloudy beer is NOT a negative.

    PS: I was also not impressed with my 1st batch that came with my kit ... Today Im glad I kept going!
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  2. #52
    [QUOTE=JIGSAW;30311]Not gonna read the whole thread again, but what was your 1st brew? A kit+kilo, Partial extract, or full all grain ?
    *****************************
    And to add to it all it now appears to be alcohol -10 % beer, week two and the beer was nicely carbonated and pretty good to drink, but tasted like low alcohol beer. I tested it fresh and after de-gassing - reads -10 % on the alcohol meter.
    DESPONDENT>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> INDEED>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    what do I do with beer flavored soda water?.

  3. #53
    Hold back. You cant use that %alc scale on the hydrometer on a final gravity reading. It wont work (dosnt work on starting gravity either, it assusmes you will finish at 1000 and that a large error on beer, fine for wine)

    Take your og(original gravity) from before you pitch the yeast.
    Take your fg(final gravity) this is the gravity after 2weeks of fermentation but the true way of determining this is if youve taken a sample 3 days in a row that have read the same gravity, ehile stil at fermentation temp.

    Plug these values into a alc calculator.
    The number it spits out is your %
    Beersmith has one but there are many online

    Sorry for the long explanation. Its most likely unnecessary but if not im happy

    Sent from my SM-A515F using Tapatalk

  4. #54
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Treeman;30313]
    Quote Originally Posted by JIGSAW View Post
    Not gonna read the whole thread again, but what was your 1st brew? A kit+kilo, Partial extract, or full all grain ?
    *****************************
    And to add to it all it now appears to be alcohol -10 % beer, week two and the beer was nicely carbonated and pretty good to drink, but tasted like low alcohol beer. I tested it fresh and after de-gassing - reads -10 % on the alcohol meter.
    DESPONDENT>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> INDEED>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    what do I do with beer flavored soda water?.
    Easiest is to know you gravity readings ....

    Then use this : (OG - FG) * 131.25 = ABV

    You can add 0.5 for the sugar you add to the bottles for carbonation.

    So example: 1.045(OG) - 1.008(FG) = 0.037*131.25 = 4,85625 + 0.5 = 5,35625 (So a 5.4% Beer)
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  5. #55
    SG or specific gravity hydrometer measure the density of sugars in a water solution and is calibrated as such to be 1.000 in clean water
    Alcometer is calibrated for ethanol solution readings.

    Both have variances wrt temperature

  6. #56
    I can use neither to get a ABV after beer is bottled ?

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treeman View Post
    I can use neither to get a ABV after beer is bottled ?
    In order to calculate the ABV of the beer, you need to take a reading before adding the yeast and then another reading when the fermentation is complete. The difference between those two readings is used to calculate the beer's ABV. The difference in the readings is a measurement of how much sugar was eaten by the yeast and turned into alcohol. Without the first reading, for the home brewer, it is impossible to know the real ABV. However, if you brewed a kit and kilo beer (from a can with a bag of DME or sugar) you can calculate a rough ABV from the "generic" values.

  8. #58
    • Purchase a six pack of a beer or a bottle of wine of a known ABV.

    • Drink said six pack over a leisurely hour or two, until drunk (ask wife to note)

    • The next day, drink an equivalent amount of your beer over an equivalent time period and compare drunkenness. (again, ask wife to note)

    • If less drunk, purchase a lower ABV and repeat steps 1-3. If more drunk, purchase a higher ABV and repeat steps 1-3.

    • If you're just as drunk, congratulations, you've determined your beer's ABV!

      My wife tells me my beer consistently makes me "happier", so i know my beer is more than 4%ABV as per above method.
      cheers

  9. #59


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  10. #60
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamlL View Post
    • Purchase a six pack of a beer or a bottle of wine of a known ABV.
    • Drink said six pack over a leisurely hour or two, until drunk (ask wife to note)
    • The next day, drink an equivalent amount of your beer over an equivalent time period and compare drunkenness. (again, ask wife to note)
    • If less drunk, purchase a lower ABV and repeat steps 1-3. If more drunk, purchase a higher ABV and repeat steps 1-3.
    • If you're just as drunk, congratulations, you've determined your beer's ABV!

      My wife tells me my beer consistently makes me "happier", so i know my beer is more than 4%ABV as per above method.
      cheers
    I like that way of testing
    cool3.jpg
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


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