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  1. #1

    Hazy beer opinions


    Hi all

    Im not new to the forum, but first post. Thanks for everyones contribution here, has been a great resource as Ive got into brewing.

    Just wanted to hear some thoughts on my latest couple of batches. I recently brewed an all grain Pilsner/Saaz SMaSH, and a pale ale. Both were made with my first non-kit grains - i.e. bought in bulk and milled myself.

    Both these beers are super-hazy despite cold-crashing. The Pilsner is starting to gradually clear up after a couple of weeks in the keg. The pale ale is a few days behind but looks almost NEIPA-like in haziness.

    Its not a train smash because they both taste just fine, but Im just interested in opinions as to why these two brews would be so much more hazy than the kit-bought all grains that Ive done previously? Too fine grind? Or something else going on?

    thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Presence of protien and polyphenols the beer. Addition of finning towards end of boil can aid in clearing. (i.e. Irish moss, Whirlfloc, Polyclar etc.)
    Some grain have more protiens than others. Compare grain used in kits and your non kit grains.

    Yeast with low flocculation can cause hazy beer. Adddition of finning such as gelatin at end of fermentation can aid in clearing and / or cold crashing. I see you did cold crash.
    Confirm the flocculation of kit bought yeast and yeast used in your non kit brews.

    Higher sparge temperaturs can also cause more polyphenols to end up in the wort.
    Infection can also be a cause, but usually one would taste this.

    I assume you are using the same process for brewing kit and non kit beers.
    If this is not the case inspect your process, i.e. sparging, time to cool wort etc.
    Everyone must beleive in something, I beleive I'll have another beer

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by BeerHolic View Post
    Presence of protien and polyphenols the beer. Addition of finning towards end of boil can aid in clearing. (i.e. Irish moss, Whirlfloc, Polyclar etc.)
    Some grain have more protiens than others. Compare grain used in kits and your non kit grains.

    Yeast with low flocculation can cause hazy beer. Adddition of finning such as gelatin at end of fermentation can aid in clearing and / or cold crashing. I see you did cold crash.
    Confirm the flocculation of kit bought yeast and yeast used in your non kit brews.

    Higher sparge temperaturs can also cause more polyphenols to end up in the wort.
    Infection can also be a cause, but usually one would taste this.

    I assume you are using the same process for brewing kit and non kit beers.
    If this is not the case inspect your process, i.e. sparging, time to cool wort etc.
    Everything he said

  4. #4
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    @Bosvelder Welcome

    I think BeerHolic covered it all
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  5. #5
    Thanks all.

    @BeerHolic, pretty much identical process for all brews up until now. BIAB 15l kit from Beerguevara.

    Previous brews were all ales with US-05, these last 2 were with Lallemand BRY-97. So the yeast is the only obvious difference.

    And ironically, the Pilsner was the first time I tried gelatin fining

    Clearly more practice needed.

  6. #6
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    What mill are you using?

  7. #7
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    I've even found mash temps affecting clarity. I don't know why, but my higher-mashed beers didn't drop very clear. I've recently done a few tests with a few fresh wort kits I sold, and langchop actually got one of them. It was a dry Vienna lager I made, mashed VERY low (at something like 61C if I remember correctly here). The beer ended up very dry and cleared up VERY quickly with no finings added. I had the same with a Pilsner I made. I also mashed it really low and within two weeks in the bottle the beer poured almost completely crystal.

    So now I've made a Vienna lager, with a Pilsner yeast, using Saaz in the end of the boil. I mashed it low (62C as well), and it's been lagering for 3 months now post-ferment, at 2.5C. I can't wait to bottle it. I'll report back on clarity

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post

    So now I've made a Vienna lager, with a Pilsner yeast, using Saaz in the end of the boil. I mashed it low (62C as well), and it's been lagering for 3 months now post-ferment, at 2.5C. I can't wait to bottle it. I'll report back on clarity
    Busy with my first properly lagered beer as well. 10 days so far at 12,5 deg, going to drop it 1 deg a day from Friday and leave it at 3 deg when it gets there for a further 6 weeks

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    I've even found mash temps affecting clarity. I don't know why, but my higher-mashed beers didn't drop very clear. I've recently done a few tests with a few fresh wort kits I sold, and langchop actually got one of them. It was a dry Vienna lager I made, mashed VERY low (at something like 61C if I remember correctly here). The beer ended up very dry and cleared up VERY quickly with no finings added. I had the same with a Pilsner I made. I also mashed it really low and within two weeks in the bottle the beer poured almost completely crystal.

    So now I've made a Vienna lager, with a Pilsner yeast, using Saaz in the end of the boil. I mashed it low (62C as well), and it's been lagering for 3 months now post-ferment, at 2.5C. I can't wait to bottle it. I'll report back on clarity
    if you add irish moss or whirfloc to your beer, it'll coagulate the proteins and drop it into your trub. It's quite visible actually, however, I'm not for adding these adjuncts to my boil, rather just fine on crash longer

  10. #10
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    I haven't seen a difference in adding irish moss to my beer in the final clarity (personally). Yes, the wort drops clear a lot quicker, that's true, but regarding the end beer-in-glass result, I haven't seen much difference. To me, a good rolling boil with a proper hot bread makes a bigger difference. As such, I've done three or four brews with irish moss and now the rest is just sitting there.

    I was just commenting on the mash temps as I remember getting great feedback on clarity from all the guys (I think Snorlax on here as well as langchop both said it) that the beers dropped VERY clear, VERY shortly after bottling with no finings added on the end, and I didn't add anything. I just mashed lower.

    I'm not saying it's something, but maybe it's something to test. I'll give it a shot when I have a tiny bit more time. Big difference in mash temps with the same recipe, and then check the effect on clarity. I want to do a SAB budget brew again anyway, so that'll be good to test. Need to give my African Queen a bit of a workout.

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