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  1. #1

    Diacetyl/"Off" flavour


    HI Al

    Just some of your insight please. Ive had two batches now out of my last 6 brews that smells and taste like diacetyl.

    Last one is a pilsner ive fermented 16days, cold crash 1 1/2 day and gelatin fine anther day.

    Does diacetyl go away with bottle conditioning, ive had the first batch, a pale ale sitting since end june but still gives a horrible taste of diacetyl.

    what can be possible other causes other than taking beer too soon off the cake, not letting rest, getting trub into the bottling bucket,etc..

    One thing i picked it up when checking FG during fermentation, thats why i let the last batch sit longer than usual 12-14 days.

    OR, is it some other off taste that i dont know. best to describe it is a buttery, oily somewhat rubbery taste.
    sorry i dont have a "Toxxyc" palate, so im maybe not very accurate in my tasting.

    Is there any remedy for this beer, two batches of 40ish bottles cant go to waste, or should i just plug my nose and swallow, i drank two from each batch and im still alive so cant be infection.

    Advise plse

  2. #2
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    Diacetyl tastes like butter, yes. Some say it's very much like popcorn butter, but I don't think rubber should be part of it. It's usually driven off during a diacetyl rest at the end of the fermentation, and I don't think it'll go away in the bottle.

    "Oily rubber" points me to skunking. It could be very light skunking, but that's the closest I could describe skunking as in some beers I've had that has skunked. Wet, burned rubber. Really off.

    If the beers are "ruined" according to you, take them to someone with a still and make yourself a batch of whisky or something like that. At least get something out of it.

  3. #3
    band aid = phenols. did you use bleach to clean your equipment? high chlorine % in your water?

  4. #4
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Add more hops
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  5. #5
    @ Toxxyc, doubt it can be skunked, lightstruck if you mean that. beer was never out of the garage since brewing to bottling.

    I only use newlands spring water for my brews, the other 4 brews turned out fine, especially the windhoek clone

    @Jigsaw, ädd more hops" please elaborate

  6. #6
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamlL View Post
    @ Toxxyc, doubt it can be skunked, lightstruck if you mean that. beer was never out of the garage since brewing to bottling.

    I only use newlands spring water for my brews, the other 4 brews turned out fine, especially the windhoek clone

    @Jigsaw, ädd more hops" please elaborate
    Was joking ... just saying add more hops till it taste drinkable

    What you could try is this test ....

    1/ Put a sample of your young beer into each of two glasses and cover them.

    2/ Put one glass in the hot water bath and keep it there for about 10-20 minutes.

    3/ After 20 minutes, cool the hot beer to the same relative temperature as the control sample by placing it in a cold water bath for a few minutes.

    4/ Remove the covers and smell each of your beer samples (don't forget which is which). One of the following things will happen:
    a/ Neither sample smells buttery. This is the best-case-scenario because it means that all of the diacetyl precursor AAL has already been converted to diacetyl and your beer does not need a diacetyl rest.
    b/ The heated sample smells buttery, but the control sample does not. This indicates that there is excessive AAL in your beer and you should ramp the temp up (if it's a lager) by 5-10° F (1 - 2°C) for a diacetyl rest, and age it for a few days to allow the AAL to form diacetyl and the yeast to metabolize the diacetyl. For ales, a few more days of conditioning is indicated. You need to do the test again to insure conversion is complete and your beer is stable.
    c/ Both samples can smell like butter. This might indicate a pedio infection, in which case you should probably dump the beer. It could also mean that your yeast cannot metabolize the diacetyl because the majority of them are petite mutants.
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  7. #7
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    Diacetyl rest. Some lager brewers take their beer up to 18 degrees for 24 hours then cold crash.

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