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  1. #1

    Starting off with kegging


    Are the any kegs that you should avoid and for what reasons?

    I'm talking about corny vs g-type vs s-type etc.

  2. #2
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    Lots of good info in other threads on this forum if you do a bit of a search.

    Short answer. G/S type are difficult to open/clean/fill without the associated tools that a modern brewery has (i.e. not homebrewer friendly).

    Corny kegs are typically more suited to homebrewing size wise at 19l. They originated in the soda industry. Pin lock kegs were made for Coca-Cola and Ball Lock for Pepsi. They're easier to clean / maintain due to wider openings on top that you can actually get your hand in.

    Pin lock vs Ball lock is 6 of the one / half dozen of the other to some extent. One of the main differences (other than the obvious differences in pin vs ball lock of the gas/beer posts) is the pressure relief valve on the lid of the kegs. Ball locks have a PRV that you can manually vent. Pin Locks have PRV that'll vent past certain pressure, but you can't manually actuate it. That said you can simple swop the lid over for one with a ball lock PRV – they’re interchangeable.

    New ball lock kegs are generally imported from Chine. Used Pin lock kegs are generally ex-coca cola kegs that have been imported and seals replaced etc. I personally went with Pin lock. Saved a couple of bucks and Richard from Kegsolutions is of the opinion that the US made pin lock cornys were built to a higher standard than the ball locks being produced today in China.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Rikusj View Post
    Lots of good info in other threads on this forum if you do a bit of a search.

    Short answer. G/S type are difficult to open/clean/fill without the associated tools that a modern brewery has (i.e. not homebrewer friendly).

    Corny kegs are typically more suited to homebrewing size wise at 19l. They originated in the soda industry. Pin lock kegs were made for Coca-Cola and Ball Lock for Pepsi. They're easier to clean / maintain due to wider openings on top that you can actually get your hand in.

    Pin lock vs Ball lock is 6 of the one / half dozen of the other to some extent. One of the main differences (other than the obvious differences in pin vs ball lock of the gas/beer posts) is the pressure relief valve on the lid of the kegs. Ball locks have a PRV that you can manually vent. Pin Locks have PRV that'll vent past certain pressure, but you can't manually actuate it. That said you can simple swop the lid over for one with a ball lock PRV – they’re interchangeable.

    New ball lock kegs are generally imported from Chine. Used Pin lock kegs are generally ex-coca cola kegs that have been imported and seals replaced etc. I personally went with Pin lock. Saved a couple of bucks and Richard from Kegsolutions is of the opinion that the US made pin lock cornys were built to a higher standard than the ball locks being produced today in China.
    Thanks for taking the time to respond. Your short answer is spot on what I was after as I can get a very good 2nd hand S-type for a few hundred. New coupler I see is R 7/800 so all in on the keg side of things would be a bit over a grand. Lots to think about.


    Thanks again!

  4. #4
    Yes ive got nothing to add to Rikus. Spot on

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  5. #5
    I use ex-commercial kegs, 50 liter.

    You remove the spear, stick a hose-pipe in there and swirl it around, rinse, repeat a couple of times. Add sanitiser/ SPC mixture, add pressure, and dispense the mixture through your tap, thus cleaning the tap and the piping at the same time. I have had no issues in the past year of using the kegs.

    Best advice I can give is to visit Bevan from Draughtcraft - he will get you on the right track, and you can buy everything from him, he sells second hand couplers at R400 each.
    Last edited by Dewald Posthumus; 4th February 2021 at 09:07.

  6. #6
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruHaha View Post
    Are the any kegs that you should avoid and for what reasons?

    I'm talking about corny vs g-type vs s-type etc.
    My answer is get whatever you can at a good price AS LONG AS it fits in your fridge

    IMO cleaning them have nothing to do with the lid opening, as its the chemicals that does the cleaning, and not how far you can stick your hand in there, as even with a corny I can only get my hand ˝way in there
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruHaha View Post
    Are the any kegs that you should avoid and for what reasons?

    I'm talking about corny vs g-type vs s-type etc.
    those plastic ones - pet kegs. i'd avoid a and s type purely in order to standardize on g. which i believe is most popular in this cowntry.

    i had only pin locks; now i have a couple of ball lock mini kegs and a brand new 50l g-type. why all these different kegs? i dedicated taps/lines to:
    - cornys for smaller batch size and rotatable styles (esb, apa, stouts etc)
    - 50l g-type, pilsner my goto favorite / house beer
    - minikegs for tonic, root beer and experiments

    either which way you go, bottling will become a forgotten abhorrence

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by groenspookasem View Post
    those plastic ones - pet kegs. i'd avoid a and s type purely in order to standardize on g. which i believe is most popular in this cowntry.

    i had only pin locks; now i have a couple of ball lock mini kegs and a brand new 50l g-type. why all these different kegs? i dedicated taps/lines to:
    - cornys for smaller batch size and rotatable styles (esb, apa, stouts etc)
    - 50l g-type, pilsner my goto favorite / house beer
    - minikegs for tonic, root beer and experiments

    either which way you go, bottling will become a forgotten abhorrence
    That is actually a good idea, I think I will go that route when I get a dedicated beer fridge/ kegerator. At the moment I'm only brewing certain styles of beer in 50 liter batches, but if I have corny kegs, I can do an IPA or a Stout into a 19 liter keg.

  9. #9
    I have a freezer similar to the below shape. Think I'll be able to squeeze 2 cornys in there? Online dimensions seem to indicate 230ish wide by 580ish tall.

    1.jpg

  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by BruHaha View Post
    I have a freezer similar to the below shape. Think I'll be able to squeeze 2 cornys in there? Online dimensions seem to indicate 230ish wide by 580ish tall.

    1.jpg
    Add a collar to it for more height and you will fit three cornys in there, maybe 4 at a push

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