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Thread: Rum

  1. #61

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    So to this amount of rum, I added:

    8 Allspice berries, whole
    3 Cloves, whole
    Vanilla extract, as a suspension (not vanilla flavouring)
    A pinch of aniseed, as-is (very strong in alcohol)
    A tiny pinch of ground cinnamon (very strong in alcohol)
    1 Tablespoon of Treacle 3 Molasses (the dark, thick, chunky crap I used to make this rum in the first place)

    That's where most of the colour comes from.
    If I had to take a guess it would be ground cinnamon. it's hydrophobic so doesn't mix well with water. Next time you could try using a shaving of cinnamon bark and potentially break off a piece of aniseed instead of ground.

    gonna be an epic brew anyways looks kak lekker.

  2. #62
    Senior Member JIGSAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    Update pics! Last night I snapped a pic quickly to compare the colour. For interest, this time I forewent the orange peel in the rum as I thought that's what made an absolute mess in the jar last time. It's not the orange peel, it's something else, and I don't know what. You'll notice on this pic there's a light-coloured, powdery sediment that sticks even to the side of the jar. I would LOVE to know what causes that, as it clouds up the rum and clogs the filters. I eventually drops clear, but it's a schlep:



    And after stirring it off the sides so it can sit at the bottom instead (but still some there):

    looks good
    The Problem With The World Is That Everyone Is A Few Drinks Behind.!


  3. #63
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    It's been standing open for the past two days and I have to say, the smell will turn a nun alcoholic. It's amazing how much aroma the alcohol pulls from the spices.

  4. #64
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    And an update. Seems to be clearing a bit already, at least:


  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    And an update. Seems to be clearing a bit already, at least:

    nie red color there. Chuck in more of the good stuff get it dark as night!

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jitters View Post
    nie red color there. Chuck in more of the good stuff get it dark as night!
    I've learned long ago that just chucking in "more of the good stuff" soon leads to "too much of the good stuff". Overoaking is a very easy thing to do, as is overspicing and killing the actual flavour of the rum.

    I want to preserve the true flavour of the molasses, and that tell-tale "rum flavour" that you get in all rums. From the still direct it already has the almost slightly sour, burnt sugary flavour on it that's testament to a nice rum, and all I want to do is to just enhance that with the oak and spices.

    As mentioned before, I still have to play with the backset/dunder in the final product. It apparently brings a lot of flavour to the fore which I'd love to see, so that's something I need to sit down and spend some time on sometime soon.

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    I've learned long ago that just chucking in "more of the good stuff" soon leads to "too much of the good stuff". Overoaking is a very easy thing to do, as is overspicing and killing the actual flavour of the rum.

    I want to preserve the true flavour of the molasses, and that tell-tale "rum flavour" that you get in all rums. From the still direct it already has the almost slightly sour, burnt sugary flavour on it that's testament to a nice rum, and all I want to do is to just enhance that with the oak and spices.

    As mentioned before, I still have to play with the backset/dunder in the final product. It apparently brings a lot of flavour to the fore which I'd love to see, so that's something I need to sit down and spend some time on sometime soon.
    I was only half joking, whats dunder/backset? I know very little about spirits, so sorry for the stupid questions I find it fascinating.

  8. #68
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    Backset is what you call the stuff that stays behind in the kettle after the distillation is complete. When you're making whisky, it's typically called backset, but when making rum they like to call it "dunder". Dunder is also the word used for the rotting backset that gets stored in the open to invite infections and other funky stuff to grow in it, as it's wanted. It's sometimes done literally as primitively as digging a hole in the ground and pouring all of that in there, allowing it to do what nature wants, with bugs and bacteria and fungi to go nuts in it, and that hole is called a "dunder pit" (or less commonly a muck pit).

    When the next batch of rum is then made, liquid is pulled from the dunder pit and used as a large part of the liquid for the next fermentation. The dunder is heated to kill the wild stuff in there, but it obviously preserves the flavour. Then molasses/sugars are added, it's cooled and yeast is added to allow fermentation. It's said that this rotting juice process is what gives rum it's most unique fruity, "rummy" flavours and without it you really only produce okay rums (which I'm good with). I'll possibly get a dunder pit later on, but for now, hell no. I don't have the time or space to have a barrel of rotten liquid somewhere.

    Anyway, I tapped some dunder straight from the kettle after the stripping run, and it's been sitting in the fridge, clearing up a bit. Just like with beer, the solids drop to the bottom and you can get a crystal clear dunder in a glass jar this way. It contains very little alcohol (it's been distilled off), but obviously still contains all the colour (which is now concentrated) and A LOT of flavour. I can't find nicely written down sources on the topic, but rumors say that this cooled and un-rotten dunder is used to make Captain Morgan's Dark Rum, as it contains the rum and molasses flavour, but not too much of the sweetness.

    How they get the foamy head with coke - well that's a mystery to me.

  9. #69
    damn that's super intresting. thanks for the detailed write up, and yeah. im not sure how the SO would react to a rotten dunder pit lol

  10. #70

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    rumors say that this cooled and un-rotten dunder is used to make Captain Morgan's Dark Rum, as it contains the rum and molasses flavour, but not too much of the sweetness.
    I watched a video of a local Rum distillery, the one bit that stuck with me to this day was when he described other rums. He said something like "calling Red Heart and Captain Morgan Rum, is like calling Oros orange juice" They aren't good examples of a good rum apparently.

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxxyc View Post
    How they get the foamy head with coke - well that's a mystery to me.
    I was reading/watching a conversation regarding the skuim koppie on a rum. A local guy in the industry and from what I've read and heard from him, he is clued up on the topic and most parts of this industry. Apparently the the foamy head with Coke is a mark of a cheap rum. It is the sugar that causes the foamy head. Sugar isn't something that belongs in a good rum. These aren't my words and I was very surprised to learn this.

    Rum is a lovely drink and one of my favourite spirits, but having read up on the history and how it's made in the different parts of the world is really an eye opener. The one part that gets me is the ageing. For a bottle to be labelled 7 year old, only a small part of the blend needs to be 7 yo, the rest of the blend can even be new make rum.

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